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Bachelor of  Science

Program code: 2030
QTAC code: 731001
CRICOS code: 001961J

Location

Herston, St Lucia

Duration

3 Years full-time

Commencing

Semester 1 (24 Feb, 2020)
Semester 2 (27 Jul, 2020)

Want to explore and challenge your scientific thinking? The flexible Bachelor of Science develops your interdisciplinary scientific knowledge and practical skills while letting you tailor your studies to suit your interests and ambitions.

  • This popular program offers one of the broadest selections of science disciplines in Australia – choose from 26 specialist areas (majors). Study at UQ’s city-based campuses or at the rural Gatton campus if you opt for Animal and Veterinary Bioscience.
  • Mix and match course combinations from general science and non-science disciplines and, in your second and third years, focus on your specialisation with single, extended or dual majors to deepen your knowledge.
  • Gain relevant, real-world experience through employability and work-integrated learning opportunities such as internships, industry placements, research projects and international study opportunities.
  • Graduate with a respected qualification or consider applying for an additional year of research-intensive honours. You will learn how to work independently, perform critical experiments, analyse data and communicate results.

The Bachelor of Science is a widely respected and globally recognised qualification. You will graduate with highly developed knowledge in your specialist area.

  • Teaching staff

    Learn from the best

    Our award-winning academics have an active research focus and strong connections with industry. Our teachers will challenge your thinking and you'll leave UQ equipped to find your own scientific solutions to real-world problems.

  • Beyond the classroom

    Visit unique field locations

    Conduct fieldwork in locations such as the Great Barrier Reef, Fraser Island, national parks and outback Queensland. View firsthand the rich biodiversity of Australia’s marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and contribute to widespread efforts to protect them.

  • Teaching spaces

    Innovative lab facilities

    Learn how to work confidently in a range of labs and gain practical skills to help you succeed. UQ is home to more than 2200 science labs, including wet, dry and clinical labs, PC2 and PC3 labs, and a range of animal diagnostic, operating and skills training labs.

  • Careers

    Double your opportunities

    Improve your employment prospects and broaden your skills and knowledge by combining your BSc with one of 13 other UQ programs, including Law, Education, Arts, Engineering or Business Management. See the Majors tab for dual program (double degree) options.

Majors for this program

There are 40 majors available in the Bachelor of Science.

View all majors for this program

Career outcomes

When you graduate, you will be in high demand by employers for your advanced technical, communication, independent thinking and problem-solving skills.

Depending on your major, you'll have the pick of a broad range of career possibilities in areas, including but not limited to:

  • academia and research
  • government
  • industry
  • environment
  • hospitals and health
  • marine preservation
  • secondary school teaching (with further study)
  • environmental planning and site assessment
  • operations research and logistics 
  • finance
  • animal health, welfare, nutrition and management (if you choose the Animal and Veterinary Bioscience major at UQ Gatton).

Alternatively, you can further your research ambitions by applying for the 12-month Bachelor of Science (Honours) program.

Find out more about careers that started in science

  • Why study

    Pathway to further study

    Use the Bachelor of Science as preparation for studying medicine, or as a way to improve your entry rank or gain course credit for programs such as engineering, veterinary science or pharmacy.

  • Students

    Get the most out of your studies

    Find out about compulsory or recommended courses, plan your upcoming semester and create a successful path for your degree, using the Science Study Planner.

    Find out more
  • Alumni
    “When I started university I wasn’t entirely sure what career path I wanted to follow, but I knew I wanted to work in the health sciences. Starting out with a degree that was so flexible allowed me to try a few different areas and then zero-in on what I really enjoyed.” Shannon Culley, Bachelor of Science
    Clinical Audiologist, Neurosensory Medici Medical Centre
  • Why study

    Why choose science at UQ?

Summary

  • Program code
    2030
  • QTAC code
    731001
  • Faculty
  • Duration
    3 Years full-time
  • Commencing
    Semester 1 (24 Feb, 2020)
    Semester 2 (27 Jul, 2020)
  • Program level
    Undergraduate
  • Units
    48
  • Delivery location
    Herston, St Lucia
  • AQF
    Level 7
  • CRICOS code
    001961J

Admissions criteria

Entry scores

All international applicants need to meet the minimum entry score for this program.

Prerequisites

Queensland Year 12 or equivalent English, Mathematics B plus one of Chemistry or Physics.

View the Prerequisites guide for more information about subject equivalents for interstate high schools, overseas high schools, university subjects and pathways and bridging programs.

English Proficiency

IELTS overall 6.5; reading 6; writing 6; speaking 6; listening 6. For other English Language Proficiency Tests and Scores approved for UQ

TOEFL IBT - Overall 87, listening 19, reading 19, writing 21 and speaking 19.

TOEFL PB - Overall 570, listening 54, reading 54, writing 59/5.

Pearsons - Overall Score of 64 and 60 in all sub bands.

BEP - A minimum overall grade of 4 plus a minimum grade of C in all macro skills.

CES - Overall 176 and 169 in all sub bands.

OET is not accepted.

view the English proficiency policy.

Visa requirements

International students who are accepted into full-time study in the Bachelor of Science are eligible to apply for an Australian student visa.

The Australian Government has simplified the visa application process. Now, all international students apply for the Student Visa (subclass 500).

There are a number of requirements you must satisfy before a visa is granted. Find out more about the visa application process.

Program structure

Courses

The courses offered in the Bachelor of Science are set out in the course list. Each course is allocated a certain number of units (#). A standard full-time study load is 8 units per semester.

Courses Program Rules

The Program Rules explain what is required to complete the Bachelor of Science. These requirements include the total number of units you need to complete in order to graduate.

Program Rules

To have your degree conferred, you also need to comply with UQ’s policies and rules.

Concurrent diplomas

A concurrent diploma is a diploma-level qualification (AQF 5) that you can study alongside your bachelor's program.

All diplomas are made up of 16 units. You can spread these units across the duration of your bachelor's program, or you can complete these units in an accelerated period.

Concurrent diplomas are available in:

Further study options

Graduates of the Bachelor of Science have the opportunity to progress into the following programs:

Eligibility for honours is based on your GPA. For details refer to the Program Rules for the honours program.

Programs and Courses

If you're a current student who has already commenced study at UQ, refer to Programs and Courses in my.UQ for full information about your program structure, rules and requirements.

Majors

The following is a list of majors available in the Bachelor of Science.

When you graduate, any majors, dual majors and extended majors you have completed will be listed on your degree certificate.

Archaeological Science / Extended

While archaeology is usually linked with the humanities, archaeologists are increasingly using scientific approaches to their work. Science has revolutionised research in areas like human evolution and dispersal, the development of civilisation, and human-environment relationships. As a student in the Archaeological Science major, you'll study core archaeology courses in combination with electives that examine areas like geography, earth sciences, biology, and psychology. You'll develop skills in scientific reasoning and have the fundamental knowledge to move forward in the field. UQ also has the largest number of archaeological science teaching and research staff in Australia.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Archaeological Science major develop skills in written communication, problem-solving, critical thinking, scientific knowledge and interpersonal understanding. They typically work for museums; cultural centres and agencies; law enforcement; government departments; educational and research institutions; and in industries like mining where environmental protection and management are important.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Biochemistry and molecular biology is the study of the chemical basis of life – and underpins all disciplines of biology. As a student in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology major, you'll learn about the molecular events that control the growth and development of all living things. In addition, you'll develop an understanding of how molecular events can go wrong in certain disease states and how they can be exploited to develop new drugs. A major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology is relevant to research and development in areas like medicine, the environment, agriculture, proteomics, genomics, bioinformatics, biotechnology, genetic engineering, and drug design.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology major have access to some of the most exciting and challenging careers in science and medicine. They typically work in laboratories, hospitals or government agencies in analytical and research roles. Specific roles include research biochemists, molecular biologists, and industrial biochemists.

Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics is a multidisciplinary science which applies computers to enhance our understanding of biology. Bioinformatics is changing the way we manage our health and the environment and how research in biological science is conducted. Biologists everywhere will increasingly require a working knowledge of this area as industries move more deeply into genetic technologies and the use of computing to simulate biological processes.

The field of Bioinformatics is highly interdisciplinary and is growing in importance to stakeholders, including scientific research organisations and the biotechnology sector. The single major will enable students to combine their studies with other majors, critical given the inherently interdisciplinary nature of the field of bioinformatics.

More information about what can be studied in the Bioinformatics Major.

Biomedical Science / Extended

It would be very hard to imagine the modern world without biomedical science. Biomedical scientists are interested in the cells, tissues, organs and systems that make up the human body. Along with doctors and other healthcare experts, they not only diagnose medical conditions, but also research better ways to treat, cure and prevent them. The Biomedical Science major begins by developing a broad foundation in the biological sciences during your first two years. In your third year, you'll get to choose from specialised electives in areas like physiology, pharmacology, anatomy, developmental biology, human genetics, neuroscience, human immunology and infectious diseases.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Biomedical Science major typically work in research roles (within industry, government, not-for-profit organisations, or academia), or in roles involving government health departments, pharmaceutical companies, biotechnology companies, medical foundations, toxicology, forensics, public health, hospitals, or agribusiness.

Biophysics (Dual major)

Biophysics sits at the crossroads of biology, physics, and chemistry. Biophysicists do several different things: they typically use their knowledge of physics to study the structure and function of biological molecules, cells and organisms; or they develop and build new instruments and tools for research and biomedical purposes. Biophysics also encompasses fields like bio-molecular modelling, crystallography, spectroscopy, radiology, medical physics, ultrasound, and nanotechnology. As a student in the Biophysics major, you'll study core courses in biophysics and get to choose from elective courses that cover areas like physics, chemistry, neuroscience, physiology, biochemistry and structural biology.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Biophysics major have interdisciplinary training, which means they can adapt to a variety of working environments. They usually work for universities and research centres; the pharmaceutical and cosmetological (the science of cosmetics) industries; hospitals; government departments; research and development of medical instruments; or biotechnology industry or research.

Chemical Sciences (Dual major)

Chemical science exploits the strong connections between chemistry and the biological sciences, materials sciences and nanosciences. Choose to specialise in Chemical Biology or Materials and Nanoscience. The Chemical Biology stream explores molecular processes controlling the structure and function of complex biological systems and synthesis of new molecules, which is essential in modern pharmaceutical and medical research. The Materials and Nanoscience stream explores the synthetic strategies and processes of self-assembly for the controlled arrangement of atoms and molecules. You’ll develop an understanding of the relationship between molecular structure and the macroscopic properties of systems used in medicine, energy production, electronics, biotechnology and consumer products.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Chemical Sciences major typically work in pharmaceutical and medical research, biotechnology, materials manufacturing, or research and development. Both Chemical Sciences streams also provide a platform for pursuing Honours-level study and future careers in research.

Chemistry

Chemistry is about the synthesis and study of molecules and materials. Chemistry also plays an important role in disciplines like biochemistry, engineering, food science, materials science, nanotechnology and pharmacy. As a student in the Chemistry major, you'll learn about areas like synthetic chemistry (the development of new drugs, new materials or new molecular devices); polymer chemistry (the preparation and study of new polymers, which can be used as materials, or in electronic devices, or medicines); computational chemistry (understanding and predicting molecular structures and reactions using high-level theoretical calculations and powerful supercomputers); and surface chemistry (the unique chemistry that happens at surfaces).

Career outcomes

The Chemistry major leads to a broad range of opportunities, not only because chemistry is a fundamental science, but also because it provides insight into many other sciences. Careers include: environmental or analytical chemists (who typically work in the pharmaceutical industry, environmental testing, or forensic science); research chemists (who typically work in universities, scientific institutes, or government); and various roles in private companies, local councils, state and federal government authorities (such as environmental agencies or the CSIRO), research institutes and hospitals.

Computational Sc and Biochem & Molecular Biol (Dual major)

Are you interested in simulating how new drugs or agricultural processes will work? Biochemistry and molecular biology are overlapping fields, which examine the chemical basis of life and the molecular events that govern growth and development in all living things. Together, they contribute to research in areas like medicine, the environment and agriculture. In the Computational Science, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to provide insight into questions in biochemistry and molecular biology.

Computational Science and Biomedical Science (Dual major)

Are you interested in how diseases spread in real-time? Or are you interested in simulating the immune system's response to infection? Processing large amounts of data and creating accurate models is essential to understanding human health and disease. In the Computational Science and Biomedical Science dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to solve problems in the biomedical sciences.

Computational Science and Chemistry (Dual major)

Would you like to use powerful supercomputers to better understand and predict the structures and reactivities of molecules? Or are you interested in simulating how new polymers can be used? In the Computational Science and Chemistry dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to solve real challenges in the chemical sciences.

Computational Science and Computer Science (Dual major)

Are you interested in the science OF computers, as well as science WITH computers? The Computational Science and Computer Science dual major will provide insight into both. Computer Science is about the science of computing and how it can be applied to a range of scientific disciplines. Courses in Computer Science provide a solid grounding in computational, scientific and mathematical skills. Courses also examine areas including software, information systems and management, web design, artificial intelligence and human-computer interaction.

Computational Science and Ecology (Dual major)

Are you interested in modelling how the biosphere responds to the effects of human activity? What if you could create computer programs to better help environmental management? Being able to accurately model environmental interactions is essential for solving global problems. In the Computational Science and Ecology dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to solve major problems in ecology.

Computational Science and Genetics (Dual major)

Would you like to discover the genetic basis of disease? Or are you interested in simulating how environmental factors affect our genes? Computational analysis of genome sequences is leading to exciting discoveries in areas as diverse as human medicine, agriculture, conservation biology and biotechnology. In the Computational Science and Genetics dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to solve significant challenges in genetics.

Computational Science and Geographical Sciences (Dual major)

Are you interested in simulating the growth of cities and the movement of people? The Computational Science and Geographical Sciences dual major will teach you how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to better understand climate change and its major effects: water scarcity and loss of biodiversity. You'll also learn how to plan for sustainable futures in both natural and built environments.

Computational Science and Geological Sciences (Dual major)

Are you interested in simulating how land use might affect a specific region? What if you could develop more accurate methods of mineral discovery? Geologists use advanced modelling techniques to ensure the sustainability and responsible use of our natural resources and to manage environmental challenges. In the Computational Science and Geological Sciences dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to solve problems in the geological sciences.

Computational Science and Marine Science (Dual major)

Are you interested in simulating how climate change will affect our oceans? Or do you want to show how our marine ecosystems have changed over time? In the Computational Science and Marine Science dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to solve significant problems in the marine sciences. UQ has the largest marine research facilities of any Australian tertiary institution and has state-of-the-art technologies, so you can explore the unique marine environments on the doorstep of our research stations.

Computational Science and Mathematics (Dual major)

Would you like to predict the behaviour of financial markets, or simulate the origins of our universe? In the Computational Science and Mathematics dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to provide insight into a range of mathematical problems. Mathematics is central to a large number of fields and this dual major gives graduates skills that are essential to many professions.

Computational Science and Microbiology (Dual major)

Are you interested in modelling how viruses like HIV interact with the human body? Or are you interested in simulating how infectious diseases spread? Microbiology is the study of microscopic living organisms: bacteria, viruses, fungi, algae and protozoa. Increasingly, microbiologists need to be able to analyse large amounts of data and build models. In the Computational Science and Microbiology dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to deal with questions and problems in microbiology.

Computational Science and Physics (Dual major)

Are you interested in modelling how sub-nuclear particles interact? What if you could contribute to the fields of nanotechnology, quantum technology and bio-photonics? In the Computational Science and Physics dual major, you'll learn to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to provide insight into a range of physics problems.

Computational Science and Plant Science (Dual major)

Are you interested in modelling how biofuels can be best produced? The study of plant science contributes to areas of major importance, including sustainable food, global warming and alternative fuels. Plants are regularly developed into industrial products, designer molecules, biopharmaceuticals and energy, and are used to decontaminate land and air. In the Computational Science and Plant Science dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to provide insight and find solutions in the plant sciences.

Computational Science and Psychology (Dual major)

Are you interested in modelling how the brain creates and retrieves memories? Having the ability to process data and create complex models is essential to understanding brain function, memory, higher cognition, social behaviour and many other areas of psychology. In the Computational Science and Psychology dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to provide insight into a broad range of questions in psychology.

Computational Science and Statistics (Dual major)

Are you interested in modelling historical and future droughts by using meteorological data? Statistics lets us better understand and deal with chance and uncertainty. It involves the design, collection, analysis and interpretation of numerical information in order to extract patterns and other useful information. In the Computational Science and Statistics dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and use statistics to solve real-life challenges.

Computational Science and Zoology (Dual major)

Would you like to model how climate change will affect animal evolution and diversity? In zoology, computational analysis provides insight into areas like morphology, genetics, behaviour, ecology and biochemistry. In the Computational Science and Zoology dual major, you'll learn how to construct realistic mathematical models and simulations, perform quantitative analysis of scientific problems using computers, and develop skills to address and provide insight into problems in zoology.

Computer Science / Extended

Computer scientists discover and develop new ways for computers to operate. As a field, Computer Science predates modern computing, and encompasses everything from the design of hardware through to the development of algorithms and programming languages. If you have a keen interest in computing and want to understand how (or why) computers behave and the possibilities of computation, Computer Science might be the major for you. Courses in the Computer Science major provide a solid grounding in computational, scientific and mathematical skills. Courses also examine areas including software, information systems and management, web design, artificial intelligence and human-computer interaction.

Ecology

Ecology is the scientific study of how organisms interact with each other and their environments. As a student in the Ecology major, you'll study areas including behavioural ecology, physiological ecology, population and community ecology, conservation ecology, landscape ecology and evolutionary ecology. Getting out in the field is an important part of the Ecology major. You'll get to explore locations like rainforests in Lamington National Park, outback Queensland, the Great Barrier Reef at Heron Island, and Stradbroke Island in Moreton Bay.

Career outcomes

Demand for ecologists who understand natural resource management has been strong during the past five years. Graduates of the Ecology major typically work for government departments and agencies, including the CSIRO; in private industry; in consultancies for industry, community and non-government organisations; or in environmental impact assessment.

Food Science and Nutrition (Dual major)

The study of Food Science and Nutrition involves every aspect of the food system. The food system is not only concerned with how food is the farmed, processed, and distributed, but also looks at how food is selected and consumed by people and how food effects our health. As a student in the Food Science and Nutrition major, you'll take a scientific approach to the study of food, so you can understand how and why it behaves under different conditions of processing and storage. You'll also study courses in Nutrition and develop your knowledge about how the body is nourished by food, including the effects of dietary nutrients on growth, development, health and wellbeing. The major also examines the psychological, sociological and cultural factors that influence food choice.

Career outcomes

The food industry is the largest industry in the world and there is a shortage of graduates in the nutrition, food science and technology sectors. Graduates of the Food Science and Nutrition dual major typically work in community nutrition and education; food policy; research and development; food microbiology; food quality assurance; and technical sales and marketing.

Food Science and Technology / Extended

Food science and technology is a highly interdisciplinary science, which strives to better understand food processes and ultimately develop improved food products for the world's growing population. The food you eat each day comes to you through highly technical processes based on extensive research and an understanding of the physical, microbiological and chemical makeup of food.

More information about what can be studied in the Food Science and Technology Major.

Genetics

Genetics is the study of inheritance: the structure and expression of genes, the genetic basis of traits, and the interaction between genes and the environment at the population and species level. Increasingly, doctors and scientists are also using our genetic information to diagnose, treat, prevent and cure illnesses. As a student in Genetics major, you'll develop knowledge about genomes, gene mutation, gene regulation, the inheritance of traits, bioinformatics and genomics. You'll also learn how this information can help us understand disease and lead to the development of personalised medicine.

Career outcomes

Career choices for geneticists are some of the broadest available for any of the biological sciences, ranging from ecology to research to medicine and agriculture. Graduates of the Genetics major typically work as molecular geneticists in laboratories; genetic counsellors in hospitals; conservation geneticists who study genetic diversity in endangered species; or biotechnologists.

Geographical Sciences

Geographical Science is the study of spatial patterns of physical and human phenomena at local, national and global scales. Courses in the Geographical Sciences major look at areas including physical geography, human geography and geographical information science. Physical geography is about the patterns and processes seen in systems involving climate, landforms, soils, plants and animals – as well as the effects of human activities on these systems. Human Geography is about how people interact with the environment and how physical geography is used for human purposes. Geographical information science (GIS) is the study of geographic information systems in order to model, manage, analyse and apply geo-referenced information. GIS is used in sectors including earth, biological and environmental sciences; built environments; human settlements; planning; and natural resources.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Geographical Sciences major typically work in a broad range of roles in areas including natural resource management (including coastal, river and catchment systems); national parks and wildlife conservation; ecotourism; planning the delivery of services (e.g. health or infrastructure); environmental consultancy; environmental monitoring and pollution control; and spatial information science.

Geological Sciences / Extended

Geology is about the interaction between the solid Earth, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere – and how they evolve through time. Geologists discover, develop, and manage minerals, energy, and other Earth resources. As a student in the Geological Science major you'll get to choose from courses about earth systems, mineral and rock analysis and practical field mapping, and more advanced courses about geophysics, geochemistry and subsurface modelling. You can also choose specialist courses about topics including mining geology, energy resources, geophysics, coral reefs, geochemistry, and plate tectonics and geodynamics. Several courses offer field and laboratory-based study, which gives you a chance to apply and consolidate your knowledge.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Geological Sciences major typically work in areas like exploration for energy resources, minerals and water; environmental planning; engineering; and the disposal of hazardous waste.

Marine Biology (Extended major)

The Marine Biology major focuses on the biology of marine organisms (if you're interested in the physical aspects of marine science like currents or waves, or broader marine environments, you should look at the Marine Science major). Marine Biology combines the study of marine ecology, zoology, botany and genetics to examine ocean life and life in other salt-water environments, like estuaries and wetlands. As a student in this major, you'll develop specialised knowledge about marine biological systems and learn about the ecological and environmental strategies you can use to protect them. UQ has the largest and best marine research facilities of any Australian tertiary institution and you'll have opportunities to study at the Moreton Bay Research Station, or the Heron Island Research Station in the southern Great Barrier Reef.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Marine Biology major work in many areas of research and education. They typically work in roles in engineering and consulting companies; the fishing and aquaculture industries; food technology; marine parks; ecotourism; marine resource development; marine science institutes; museums; oil companies; pharmacology; planning and management; power-generating authorities; teaching; and wildlife conservation.

Marine Science

Marine science is the scientific study of our oceans and coastal habitats, and involves learning perspectives from biology, chemistry, and Earth sciences. Courses in the Marine Science major cover areas including the living world from microbe to ecosystem; ecology; genetics; plant biology; zoology; marine invertebrates; coral reefs; and coastal processes and management. UQ has the largest and best marine research facilities of any Australian tertiary institution. As a student in the Marine Science major, you'll have an opportunity to study at the Moreton Bay Research Station, or the Heron Island Research Station in the southern Great Barrier Reef.

Career outcomes

Marine scientists work in many fields of research and education, including teaching, fisheries laboratories, wildlife conservation, marine parks, planning and management, museums, universities, marine science institutes, the fishing industry, oil companies, power-generating authorities, marine-resource development, and engineering and consulting companies.

Mathematics / Extended

Mathematics is one of the oldest fields of study and plays an important role in a large number of disciplines and professions. Pre-requisite courses for the Mathematics major cover essential topics in calculus and linear algebra; discrete mathematics; and differential equations. In higher-level courses, you'll learn about topics including mathematical analysis; probability and statistics; financial mathematics; bioinformatics; and mathematical biology. The Mathematics major offers more than 30 different courses, so you can choose topics based on your interests and career goals.

Career outcomes

Graduates with qualifications in mathematics are respected for their excellent quantitative and problem-solving abilities and have opportunities to work in a large number of roles across the public and private sectors. Many mathematics graduates study advanced degrees and go on to research positions at universities, agencies like the CSIRO or the Defence Science and Technology Organisation, and private companies. There are also opportunities in the commercial world and there has been a particular upsurge in the number of mathematicians employed in banking, finance, insurance and risk-management.

Microbiology

Microbiology is the study of microscopic living organisms: bacteria, viruses, fungi, algae and protozoa. These organisms have a major affect on nearly all aspects of life and health everywhere in the world. Microbiology has also been revolutionised by technologies in areas including proteomics, genomics, bioinformatics and genetic engineering. As a student in the Microbiology major, you'll learn about immune recognition and vaccine design; infectious diseases and how to control them; microbial biotechnology; and parasitology. You'll also understand the importance of microbiology in environmental, agricultural and industrial settings.

Career outcomes

Training in microbiology can lead to a range of career opportunities. Graduates of the Microbiology major typically work as research microbiologists (in universities, biotechnology companies and agricultural, medical and veterinary institutes); industrial microbiologists (in food and beverage quality control or in the management of waste treatment); clinical microbiologists (in hospitals to detect and identify microbes causing infectious diseases); or microbiologists (in government agencies in specialist areas such as forensics, biosecurity and quarantine).

Physics / Extended

Physics involves the study of the most basic natural laws and tries to explain how and why things work on scales from the sub-nuclear to the entire cosmos. As a student in the Physics major, you'll need to complete pre-requisite courses in mathematics; mechanics and thermal physics; and electromagnetism. You'll also get to choose from higher-level courses in areas like biophysics, quantum physics, space science and stellar astrophysics, computational physics, and statistical mechanics. During your studies you can choose to concentrate on theoretical or experimental studies, such as the nature of time or the origin of the universe. Alternatively, you might decide to apply your physics knowledge to practical areas, and develop advanced materials, or electronic and optical devices for fields like medicine, mining, astronomy and geophysics.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Physics major develop analytical and problem-solving skills that are transferable to sectors including education, finance, engineering, computing and management. Many physicists are employed by governments in research and management positions; by universities in teaching, research and technical positions; by agencies and institutions for education and science communication purposes; in the health and medical sectors; and in nuclear physics.

Plant Science

Think of two of the biggest problems facing humans today: global warming and our dependency on fossil fuels. Plant scientists are working to solve both, from the production of biofuels made from plants to the use of plants in carbon sequestration. As a student in the Plant Science major, you'll study courses that cover ecology, evolution and conservation, plant pathology, plant physiology and plant biotechnology. You'll develop understanding about how plants work, from molecules to ecosystems, in order to improve the production of food, pharmaceuticals and timber; control diseases, pests and noxious weeds; and allow plants to cope with drought, salinity and pollutants. You'll also learn how to improve and create plants for innovative purposes like biofactories.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Plant Science major become researchers, consultants, teachers and various other professionals. They typically work for multinational companies, universities or government departments, research agencies like the CSIRO, or run their own businesses. Many private companies (e.g. tissue-culture laboratories, seed companies, mining companies, plant nurseries, landscape designers and environmental consultants) employ plant scientists as ecologists, biotechnologists, conservationists, molecular biologists, marine biologists, physiologists, plant breeders, pathologists and horticulturists.

Psychology / Extended

Psychology is the scientific study of how people behave, think, and feel. It is a large discipline that covers topics like brain function, memory, conscious experience, lifespan development and social behaviour, as well as the full spectrum of functional and dysfunctional behaviour. As a student in the Psychology major, you'll have more than 30 courses to choose from. Pre-requisite courses cover topics like physiological and cognitive psychology; clinical, developmental and social psychology; and research methods. Higher-level courses cover areas like neuroscience; social and organisational psychology; health psychology; and parenting and family psychology. During your studies you'll learn how to apply scientific methods to psychological phenomena, both in the classroom and in the broader world.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Psychology major must pursue further study if they want to register as a provisional psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia. You can learn more about requirements for registration as a psychologist in Australia from the Psychology Board of Australia. Many graduates from the Psychology major choose to undertake broader careers and use their knowledge and skills in industries and sectors including: human resources; mental health services; youth and child support work; relationship counselling; residential care work; family and social services; public and private sector management; marketing, advertising and market research; disability support services and aged care; and juvenile justice and corrective services.

Public Health

Public health focuses on preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health. It is founded upon a multidisciplinary understanding of health that allows you to explore and examine the basis of disease and well-being by considering the vagaries of human behaviour, the physical environment, the socio-economic and cultural determinants of health, and the systems of health care management.

The Public Health major will provide a broad overview of public health and the critical issues it confronts. You will learn how to measure, plan, manage and evaluate health programs and services to prevent illness and promote good health in communities.

To establish core understanding of this field, you will examine the foundational disciplines of public health including: epidemiology, biostatistics, health systems, environmental health and social sciences.

More information about what can be studied in the Public Health Major.

Statistics

Statistics is very important to science because it provides a way of understanding and dealing with chance and uncertainty in nature. Statistics involves the design, collection, analysis and interpretation of numerical data in order to identify patterns and other useful information. Examples from science include the analysis of DNA and protein sequences; the improvement of medical treatments through better experimental design; and the use of meteorological data to assess drought conditions. The Statistics major provides an in-depth overview of modern statistics, in both theory and practice, and places an emphasis on applying the tools of statistics to real-world scientific problems.

Career outcomes

Graduates of the Statistics major are in high demand in business, industry, research and government. In business and industry, statisticians work in areas like quality control, and product development and improvement. Statisticians also manage assets and liabilities, and determine the risks and returns of certain investments. Statisticians are employed by nearly every government department and in many scientific, medical, environmental, defence and agricultural agencies. Businesses rely on statisticians to forecast sales, analyse business conditions, and help solve managerial problems.

Zoology

Zoology is a branch of biology that deals with the scientific study of animals. It involves studying fundamental aspects of animals' morphology, development and genetics, behaviour, ecology, physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology in order to better understand their evolution and diversity. As a student in the Zoology major, you'll get to choose from courses that cover areas including climate change biology, insect science, physiology, marine biology, fish and aquaculture, and mathematical modelling. Field courses are available in outback ecology, rainforest ecology, marine ecology, and coral reef biology.

Career outcomes

While it's unusual to find a job advertisement looking for a "zoologist" specifically, zoology offers a very large number of career options, ranging from field-based conservation work to forensics to biomedical research. Graduates of the Zoology major have found work in scientific laboratories; with Commonwealth, state and local governments; in national parks, museums, zoos and conservation authorities; with medical laboratories; and in education institutions.

You should refer to the Program Rules for more information. Full definitions of majors are available in the Policies and Procedures Library.

Financial aid

As an international student, you might be eligible for financial aid – either from your home country, or from the Australian Government.

Find out more about financial aid, including scholarships and financial aid programs.

Indicative annual fee

AUD $44,736
Indicative fee 2020

The "indicative annual fee" is the cost of enrolling in the Bachelor of Science for the 2020 academic year. It is calculated based on a standard full-time study load.

A standard full-time study load is 16 units per academic year.

If you enrol in a larger or smaller study load, your fees will be calculated on a proportionate basis.

All fees are reviewed annually.

Visit Tuition fees for more information.

Additional costs

  • Courses that include a field trip component may incur additional costs to cover transport, accommodation and food.

Scholarships

International students are eligible to apply for a number of scholarships and prizes. These may be offered by the University, the Australian Government, foreign governments, or private organisations.

Many scholarships have specific eligibility criteria and are very competitive. More information, including information about how to apply, is available on the Scholarships website.

Applying online

How you apply for the Bachelor of Science depends on what type of applicant you are.

Apply now to QTAC

Your senior schooling is from Australia

Submit your application to the Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre (QTAC) if you are an international student who is currently:

  • completing Australian year 12 (either in Australia or offshore), or
  • studying the International Baccalaureate Diploma in Australia.

Apply now to QTAC Apply now to UQ

All other international applicants

If you’re not currently studying Year 12 or the International Baccalaureate (IB) in Australia, submit your application directly to UQ using our online application form or through an approved UQ agent in your country.

Find out more about applying for undergraduate study.

Apply now to UQ

Important dates

There are a number of dates and deadlines you need to meet when applying for university.

If you’re studying year 12 in Australia, a good resource is the QTAC website, which has information about the application process and closing dates. Note: what QTAC calls a “course” we call a "program".

If you’re applying directly to UQ, the closing date for the Bachelor of Science is:

  • To commence study in semester 2 - May 31 of the year of commencement.
  • To commence study in semester 1 - November 30 of the previous year.

A full list of dates relevant to UQ students is available on the Student Matters Calendar.

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