Bachelors of  Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology

Program code: 2349
QTAC code: 717701
OP Guarantee Scheme: Yes

Min. selection threshold

OP

7
/

Rank

86
/

IB

31
Minimum selection threshold

Location

St Lucia

Duration

5.5 Years full-time (or part-time equivalent)

Commencing

Semester 1 (25 Feb, 2019)
Semester 2 (22 Jul, 2019)

Why study the Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology

Enrolment is generally restricted to single majors in the BE (Hons) program. However, where students are enrolled in the BInfTech single major, enrolment is permitted in conjunction with the BE (Hons) Electrical Eng (Extended major); Electrical & Biomedical Eng; Electrical & Computer Eng; Mechatronic Eng (Extended major). Students must obtain an approved study plan prior to enrolment in these extended majors or dual majors.

Note: Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Engineering/Bachelor of Information Technology prior to 2015 may refer to course and program information for previous years here.
Bachelor of Engineering course list (pre-2015)
Bachelor of Information Technology course list (pre-2015)

Summary

Admissions criteria

Prerequisites

Queensland Year 12 or equivalent English, Mathematics B, plus one of Chemistry or Physics.

OP / Rank / IB Diploma

Minimum selection threshold

This table shows the minimum adjusted score that was considered for admission to the Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology in 2018:

OPRankIB
7 86 31

OP / Rank profile for those offered a place in Semester 1, 2018

This table shows the entry scores of all recent secondary students who were offered a place in the Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology:

Unadjusted OP / RankAdjusted OP / Rank
Highest1 / 99 1 / 99
Median5 / 91 4 / 93
Lowest9 / 81 7 / 86

Learn more about the admissions process

Program structure

The Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology is made up of two course lists:

Each course is allocated a certain number of units (#). A standard full-time study load is 8 units per semester.

The Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology has a single set of Program Rules, which explain what is required to complete the dual program. These requirements include the total number of units you need to complete in order to graduate.

If you decide to enrol in a dual program, you can use a Dual Degree Planner to help organise your studies.

To have your degree conferred, you also need to comply with UQ’s policies and rules.

Student profile

The table below shows the most recent student intake in the Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology in Semester 1, 2018:

Applicant backgroundNumber of studentsPercentage of all students
(A) Higher education study<5 <5
(B) Vocational Education and Training (VET) study0 0%
(C) Work and life experience0 0%
(D) Recent secondary education:
  • Admitted solely on the basis of OP
N/P N/P
  • Admitted where OP and additional criteria were considered
0 0%
  • Admitted on the basis of other criteria only and OP was not a factor
0 0%
International students0 0%
Total25 100%

Student profiles show your likely peer group in a program. They are not the basis for admission to a program.

Notes:
"<5" — The number of students is less than 5.
N/A — Students not accepted in this category.
N/P — Not published. The number is hidden to protect the privacy of students in other cells.

Honours

Honours is awarded to all graduates of this program. Honours is awarded in the following classes:

  • Class I
  • Class IIA
  • Class IIB
  • Class IIIA
  • Class IIIB

Class of honours depends on your GPA. For details refer to the Program Rules.

Practicals, placements and internships

Completion of 450 hours of Engineering Professional Practice to satisfy the requirements of Engineers Australia.

Professional memberships

Graduates may be eligible for membership with the following professional bodies:

  • Australian Computer Society
  • Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
  • Engineers Australia
  • Institution of Chemical Engineers

Concurrent diplomas

A concurrent diploma is a diploma-level qualification (AQF 5) that you can study alongside your bachelor's program.

All diplomas are made up of 16 units. You can spread these units across the duration of your bachelor's program, or you can complete these units in an accelerated period.

Concurrent diplomas are available in:

Further study options

Graduates of the Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology have the opportunity to progress into the following programs:

Programs and Courses

If you're a current student who has already commenced study at UQ, please see Programs and Courses for full information about your program structure, rules and requirements.

Majors

The following is a list of majors available in the Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology.

When you graduate, any majors, dual majors and extended majors you have completed will be listed on your degree certificate.

Chemical Engineering

Chemical engineers invent, design, and manage products and processes that transform raw materials into valuable products using the latest knowledge of biology, chemistry and physics to ensure minimum loss of materials and consumption of energy. This value-adding must be safe, economical and environmentally sound. It is a rapidly changing profession with chemical engineers working at the cutting-edge of fields such as molecular biology, nano-materials and chemistry, physics, mathematics and information technology.

Chemical engineers design both products and the processes needed for their commercial-scale production. They also manage operation and optimisation of these processes to produce such products as petrol, plastics, instant coffee, pharmaceuticals, and artificial blood.

Civil Engineering

Civil engineers provide for people's needs, and are expert in the planning, design, construction and maintenance of facilities that contribute to modern life. They understand the way in which natural phenomena behave, including water and wind, and how buildings of all kinds are able to resist loads. They work with buildings, bridges, roads, harbours, dams, airports, coastal protection, water supply and public health. Civil engineers apply their theoretical knowledge to produce efficient and economic facilities that are aesthetically pleasing and satisfy society's needs. They have an aptitude for mathematics and physics and a desire to meet environmental and technological challenges. Students can study in the areas of structural engineering, hydraulic engineering, transportation engineering, geomechanics, hydrology and public health engineering, or management, construction and economics.
Civil engineers provide expert financial and technical advice, and plan and coordinate projects from concepts through to completion.

Computer Systems and Networks

This major gives students a strong background in understanding how software is controlled on one or many computers, including security, networking and operating systems. It is a strongly technical major, requiring strong conceptual and programming skills. Courses focus on programming, computer architecture, computer networks, networks programming, operating systems, distributed computing, systems security, as well as distributed software applications involving Internet applications and ubiquitous computing applications. Graduates can look forward to careers in security, design of new cutting edge computer systems and integration of large-scale systems based on networked machines.

Electrical Engineering / Extended

Electrical engineering is concerned with electrical and electronic devices and systems. Electrical engineers work with equipment ranging from heavy power generators to tiny computer chips. Their work contributes to almost every sector of society: for example, home theatre entertainment systems, mobile phones, digital cameras and television to enhance our lifestyle, medical imaging systems for improved health care, electrical appliances for homes, scientific instruments for laboratories, lasers for reliable high speed communication, handheld multimedia devices to provide information on the move, and satellite systems for remote sensing of the environment and reliable mobile and fixed energy systems to power all of these.
Electrical engineers usually work in one of six speciality areas: power generation and transmission; electronics; computers; communication systems; instrumentation and measurement; and automatic controls. Career opportunities are found in the telecommunications industry, mining and transport sector, computer industry, or in power generation and transmission industries. They are also employed by electronics companies, both large and small. Many of our graduates are forming their own companies quite early in their careers.

Electrical and Biomedical Engineering (Dual major)

New discoveries and developments in biology and medicine have led to the rapid change and growth of biotechnology research and industry. Biomedical Engineering bridges the gap between technology, medicine and biology. It integrates physical, chemical, mathematical and computational sciences and engineering principles with the ultimate aim of improving health care. The degree commences with a broad foundation of preparatory courses in engineering, mathematics, biology and physics, followed by more advanced coursework and laboratory training, combining engineering analysis and design techniques with biology and physiology of cells and organisations. The program is project-focussed including a full-year project in fourth year to develop individual design and research skills, an approach valued by employers. Graduates of biomedical engineering may be involved in the design, construction and development of health and monitoring devices and computers, diagnostic systems and therapeutic systems. They may also work with models of physiological function and prosthetics and implants.

Electrical and Computer Engineering (Dual major)

Most of the world's computers are embedded computers - computers that are hidden within cars, appliances, digital cameras, MP3 players, phones and other devices. Electrical and Computer engineering is concerned with the design and management of computer-based systems, including embedded systems and more conventional computers such as personal computers (PCs) and personal digital assistants (PDAs). Electrical and Computer engineers have skills and knowledge in digital logic design, computer networks, embedded and desktop operating systems, microcontroller selection and programming, electronics, telecommunications and signal processing.

Mechanical Engineering

One of the broadest areas of engineering activity, mechanical engineers have a strong understanding of fundamental engineering science and mathematics and use this to design and maintain a wide range of machines and engineering systems. Mechanical engineers design and oversee the manufacture of machinery and equipment for all branches of industry, including major operations such as power plants. If failures occur, they analyse the cause of the failure and determine how to avoid this in the future. Mechanical Engineers develop methods for the economical combustion of fuels, the conversion of heat energy into mechanical power and the use of that power to perform useful work.

Mechatronic Engineering (Extended major)

Mechatronic engineering is one of the newest branches of engineering, and has far-reaching applications to every sector of society. Mechatronic engineers integrate precision mechanical engineering with electronics, computer systems, and advanced controls, to design and construct products and processes. Microscale sensor and actuator technologies are developed and applied to create intelligent consumer products. Mechatronic engineers are in great demand as industries seek to apply evolutionary advances in computers, electronics, sensors, and actuators to improve their products, processes and services.
Graduates have the knowledge and skills to design and build advanced products such as robots and machine tools; scientific instrumentation; and high performance automatic suspension and braking systems. Mechatronic engineers are employed by product developers and manufacturers, the mining industry, the aerospace and defence sectors, in self-owned companies and by government and industry research groups. Graduates are in demand wherever there is potential for improvement in the integration of computer and electrical hardware with mechanical systems.

Mining Engineering

Mining engineering is the extraction of valuable ores from the ground for processing and utilisation. It involves all phases of mining operations: from exploration and discovery, through feasibility, development, production, processing and marketing, to final land restoration and rehabilitation. Responsibility for the development and production phases of a mine requires a broad knowledge of all mining operations and skills in leadership and industrial relations.
Graduates are employed by mining companies, initially at the mining centres where minerals are extracted. With experience, mining engineers progress to senior managers or technical specialists, mine inspectors and advisers to government bodies. Many are employed by international companies, and gain overseas experience. Mining engineers are also employed by civil engineering companies to supervise tunnelling and open-cut operations for railways, roads, hydroelectric and sewerage works.

Software Design

This major is aimed at students who wish to follow a career in the creation and management of software applications. Courses in this major focus on programming, software engineering, project management, requirements analysis, specification, and the software process, as well as software applications involving Internet design, human-computer interaction, algorithms, data structures, and concurrency.

Software Information Systems

This major is designed for students who wish to pursue a career in developing and managing database-oriented information systems. Learn about cutting-edge approaches to large-scale database design, including systems which span multiple organisations.

User Experience Design

The vast majority of ICT is designed to be used by people in all walks of life. From mission critical commercial software, to personal fitness apps and casual games on a smartphone, a User Experience (UX) Designer is concerned with how the technology should be designed so that it is appropriate for its intended use. This major is intended for students who want to take up careers in the multi-skilled and interdisciplinary field of human-centred design. UX designers are increasingly sought after across all sectors of ICT, where the combination of people skills along with creativity and technical ability produces graduates who are prepared for the rapidly changing future of technology design. Courses studied in this major focus on design skills and creativity, programming, and prototyping in different media. Design skills are consolidated in the BInfTech Design Computing studio courses.

Sometimes dual programs will have different majors to the ones listed on course lists, or on individual program pages for each of its component degrees.

You should refer to the Program Rules for more information. Full definitions of majors are available in the Policies and Procedures Library.

Government assistance

HECS-HELP

Domestic places in the Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology are Commonwealth Supported. This means the cost of your education is shared between you and the Australian Government.

Instead of tuition fees, Commonwealth Supported students pay what are called student contribution amounts.

HECS-HELP is an Australian Government loan scheme to assist eligible students with the cost of their student contribution amounts.

Find out more about HECS-HELP.

Centrelink Support

The Australian Government offers a number of income-support payments to eligible Australian university students. For more information, visit the Centrelink website.

Indicative annual fee

AUD $9,359
Indicative fee 2019 Commonwealth supported place

The "indicative annual fee" is the approximate cost of enrolling in a Commonwealth supported place (CSP) in the Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology for the 2019 academic year. It is calculated based on a standard full-time study load.

A standard full-time study load is 16 units over two semesters. Actual fees (student contribution amounts) will vary according to your choice of courses and their unit value.

The Australian Government indexes student contributions each year.

Visit Student contributions and tuition fees for more information.

Additional costs

  • Safety boots (AS2210) (up to $140)
  • Hard hat (AS1801) ($15)
  • Safety induction program ($40 with group, or $80 individual)
  • Students who undertake vacation work, fieldwork or work experience will be required to fund their own travel and living expenses.

Scholarships

The University offers more than 200 scholarships for prospective students and more than 350 scholarships and prizes for current students.

Scholarships cover the full range of academic disciplines and are open to domestic students and international students.

Many scholarships have specific eligibility criteria. More information, including information about how to apply, is available on the Scholarships website.

Applying to QTAC

Apply now to QTAC

All domestic student applications for the Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology need to be lodged through the Queensland Tertiary Admissions Centre (QTAC).

You can list up to six programs in order of preference on your QTAC application. Listing the maximum of six will strengthen your chances of being offered a place at university.

The QTAC code for the Bachelors of Engineering (Honours)/Information Technology is 717701. You'll need this when applying.

Find out more about applying for undergraduate study.

Apply now to QTAC

Important dates

There are a number of dates and deadlines you need to meet when applying for university. Many of these dates are managed by organisations that are independent of UQ.

A good resource is the QTAC website, which has information about the application process and closing dates. Note: what QTAC calls a "course” we call a "program".

A full list of dates relevant to UQ students is available on the Student Matters Calendar.

Admission schemes

Applying to university can be both exciting and daunting, which is why we’ve tried to make the process as simple and certain as we can.

We have several schemes in place to improve your chances of getting a place at UQ.

Learn more about admission schemes

Admission pathways

A rank or score doesn’t determine your potential.

If you're not offered a place in your first-choice program – or if you don't meet the typical entry requirements – you still have a number of options.

Read more about admission pathways

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