Why study the Bachelors of Mathematics/Information Technology

The dual four-year program provides students with a focused background in Information Technology along with the in-depth knowledge of a mathematics degree.

The Information Technology component is a hands-on project-focused program based on international standards for computer science and information systems. Students study programming languages, algorithms and information structure and develop the ability to process data or information to solve problems.

In the Mathematics component you will develop a comprehensive specialised knowledge in one field of mathematics or a high level of sophistication in the applications of mathematics. Modern computation, advances in scientific technology and the increasing production of data have all increased the scope for applications of mathematics well beyond the traditional areas of engineering and the physical sciences, to include fields such as finance, economics, information technology and molecular biology. There is increasing recognition that graduates with high-level quantitative and analytic skills will play a key role at the forefront of new developments in these and other fields.

Summary

Entry requirements

Prerequisites

Year 12 or equivalent English and Mathematics B.

Program structure

The Bachelors of Mathematics/Information Technology is made up of two course lists:

Each course is allocated a certain number of units (#). A standard full-time study load is 8 units per semester.

The Bachelors of Mathematics/Information Technology has a single set of Program Rules, which explain what is required to complete the dual program. These requirements include the total number of units you need to complete in order to graduate.

If you decide to enrol in a dual program, you can use a Dual Degree Planner to help organise your studies.

To have your degree conferred, you also need to comply with UQ’s policies and rules.

Concurrent diplomas

A concurrent diploma is a diploma-level qualification (AQF 5) that you can study alongside your bachelor's program.

All diplomas are made up of 16 units. You can spread these units across the duration of your bachelor's program, or you can complete these units in an accelerated period.

Concurrent diplomas are available in:

Courses and Programs

Majors

The following is a list of majors available in the Bachelors of Mathematics/Information Technology.

When you graduate, any majors, dual majors and extended majors you have completed will be listed on your degree certificate.

Applied Mathematics

The applied mathematics major focuses on the derivation and evaluation of models in the physical, biological and engineering sciences. Advanced techniques for solving differential equations using advanced mathematics are studied in the second and third year of the major. Computation plays an increasingly large role in the solution of problems in applied mathematics, and the algorithms and ideas which allow their efficient solution form an important part of the field. Courses in the major provide students with the skills to implement and develop these methods.

More information about the Applied Mathematics Major.

Computer Systems and Networks

This major gives students a strong background in understanding how software is controlled on one or many computers, including security, networking and operating systems. It is a strongly technical major, requiring strong conceptual and programming skills. Courses focus on programming, computer architecture, computer networks, networks programming, operating systems, distributed computing, systems security, as well as distributed software applications involving Internet applications and ubiquitous computing applications. Graduates can look forward to careers in security, design of new cutting edge computer systems and integration of large-scale systems based on networked machines.

Data Analytics and Operation Research

Data analytics and operations research are rapidly growing disciplines that use a range of mathematical, statistical and computational approaches to extract information and make decisions in areas from pure science research to applied business management.

This major will provide students with skills in analysing large and complex data sets and making effective decisions using optimisation techniques.

More information about the Data Analytics and Operations Research Major.

Mathematical Physics

The field of mathematical physics focuses on the mathematical foundations of modern physical theories. It provides the mathematical understanding and tools underpinning a broad range of contemporary science including statistical mechanics, relativity and the quantum theory of many body systems.

Students who undertake a major in mathematical physics will gain the mathematical background required to understand and describe nature at its most fundamental levels. The major will not only prepare students for research in mathematical physics and related disciplines; it will foster creativity and develop high-level skills in critical and analytical thinking, paramount in problem solving.

More information about the Mathematical Physics Major.

Pure Mathematics

The pure mathematics major develops foundations and theory in a broad range of mathematical fields. Students study mathematical concepts in terms of their intrinsic nature and fundamental properties, gaining an appreciation of the ubiquity, universality and beauty of mathematics.

Courses in the major develop high-level skills in critical, analytical and abstract thinking, and provide frameworks for deeper understanding of other areas of mathematics such as applied mathematics, mathematical physics and statistics. The major offers the opportunity to acquire a solid grounding in the key areas of pure mathematics, as well to undertake focused study in advanced courses. Our pure mathematics courses cover areas such as algebra, analysis, combinatorics, geometry, number theory and topology.

More information about the Pure Mathematics Major.

Software Design

This major is aimed at students who wish to follow a career in the creation and management of software applications. Courses in this major focus on programming, software engineering, project management, requirements analysis, specification, and the software process, as well as software applications involving Internet design, human-computer interaction, algorithms, data structures, and concurrency.

Software Information Systems

This major is designed for students who wish to pursue a career in developing and managing database-oriented information systems. Learn about cutting-edge approaches to large-scale database design, including systems which span multiple organisations.

Statistics

Statistics provides the mathematics and techniques necessary for understanding and dealing with chance and uncertainty. It involves the design, collection, analysis and interpretation of data, with the aim of extracting patterns and other useful relationships. A key feature of statistics is the development and use of probabilistic models for random phenomena, which can be analysed and used to make predictions and decisions.

More information about the Statistics Major.

User Experience Design

The vast majority of ICT is designed to be used by people in all walks of life. From mission critical commercial software, to personal fitness apps and casual games on a smartphone, a User Experience (UX) Designer is concerned with how the technology should be designed so that it is appropriate for its intended use. This major is intended for students who want to take up careers in the multi-skilled and interdisciplinary field of human-centred design. UX designers are increasingly sought after across all sectors of ICT, where the combination of people skills along with creativity and technical ability produces graduates who are prepared for the rapidly changing future of technology design. Courses studied in this major focus on design skills and creativity, programming, and prototyping in different media. Design skills are consolidated in the BInfTech Design Computing studio courses.

Sometimes dual programs will have different majors to the ones listed on course lists, or on individual program pages for each of its component degrees.

You should refer to the Program Rules for more information. Full definitions of majors are available in the Policies and Procedures Library.

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